The Funny Little Man: The Biography Of A Graphic Image

The Funny Little Man: The Biography Of A Graphic Image

The Funny Little Man: The Biography of a Graphic Image

"The history of graphic design of the 20s and 30s—especially the German contribution—is an indispensable part of any designer’s education. Virginia Smith’s The Funny Little Man provides a good start." —Paul Rand "… a wonderfully quirky history of a significant period and practice of graphic design history … a delightful means of accessing not only this period, but the idea of abstraction and symbology in graphic design." —Steve Heller

From the Inside Flap
The Funny Little Man Virginia Smith Early in the twentieth century, a new icon of modernism appeared—a humorous, miniaturized representation of the human figure, which Virginia Smith calls "The Funny Little Man." It emerged in different international centers of artistic activity, popping up in posters, newspapers, and other printed pieces. The Funny Little Man’s evolution is traced from his lively youth, which reflected the brisk confidence of early Modernism, to his eventual "death," which coincided with Modernism’s decline. In this narrative of the Funny Little Man, his various stopping points—German commercial art, French posters, "production art" of the Russian Constructivist movement, and American advertising of the 1940s—introduce the reader to the lives, work, and...

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