The Cotton Dust Papers: Science, Politics, And Power In The "Discovery" Of Byssinosis In The U.S (Work, Health And Environment Series)

The Cotton Dust Papers: Science, Politics, And Power In The "Discovery" Of Byssinosis In The U.S (Work, Health And Environment Series)

The Cotton Dust Papers: Science, Politics, and Power in the "Discovery" of Byssinosis in the U.S (Work, Health and Environment Series)

"The Cotton Dust Papers" is the story of the 50-year struggle for recognition in the U.S. of this pernicious occupational disease. The authors contend that byssinosis could have and should have been recognized much sooner, as a great deal was known about the disease as early as the 1930s. Using mostly primary sources, the authors explore three instances from the 1930s to the 1960s in which evidence suggested the existence of brown lung in the mills, yet nothing was done. What the story of byssinosis makes clear is that the economic and political power of private owners and managers can hinder and shape the work of health investigators.

From Publishers Weekly
Health officials as far back as the 1930s were aware of a sometimes deadly disease suffered by textile workers called "brown-lung," or byssinosis, that was caused by prolonged exposure to cotton dust. But it was not until 1978 that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) paid attention, estimating that 35,000 people had the disease and 100,000 more were at risk, and imposing a standard...

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