German Immigrants, Race, And Citizenship In The Civil War Era (Publications Of The German Historical Institute)

German Immigrants, Race, And Citizenship In The Civil War Era (Publications Of The German Historical Institute)

German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era (Publications of the German Historical Institute)

This study of Civil War-era politics explores how German immigrants influenced the rise and fall of white commitment to African-American rights. Intertwining developments in Europe and North America, Alison Clark Efford describes how the presence of naturalized citizens affected the status of former slaves and identifies 1870 as a crucial turning point. That year, the Franco-Prussian War prompted German immigrants to reevaluate the liberal nationalism underpinning African-American suffrage. Throughout the period, the newcomers' approach to race, ethnicity, gender, and political economy shaped American citizenship law."

Review
"A brilliant study in every respect, full of local texture, of importance for the whole story of a key period in US history, and of powerfully rendered transnational crosscurrents. Efford's deep research establishes the dramatic connection of German Americans to freedom struggles in the 1850s and 1860s and to the retreat from such commitments in the waning of Reconstruction, convincingly connecting both with the changing history of the land that immigrants left."
David Roediger, University of Illinois, and coauthor of The Production of Difference (2012)

"German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War...

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