Choir And Chorus Conducting: A Treatise On The Organazation, Management, Training, And Conducting Of Choirs And Chorus Societies

Choir And Chorus Conducting: A Treatise On The Organazation, Management, Training, And Conducting Of Choirs And Chorus Societies

Choir and Chorus Conducting: A Treatise on the Organazation, Management, Training, and Conducting of Choirs and Chorus Societies

An excerpt from Part V. Chapter III.

The Conductor in Performance. — The conductor will do well to look over his music, or at least the more important numbers thereof, immediately before a performance.

The conductor should face his forces with a smiling countenance. Should he be nervous or anxious, he must not betray his feelings, or the performers will become troubled and fearful.

At all points of possible danger, such as difficult entries, etc., the conductor should watch his forces to see that they are ready before the moment for attack arrives. Neither choralists, orchestra players, nor soloists can be depended upon to be always ready.

The conductor stands between the composer and the listener as an interpreter. Upon him rests the responsibility for securing an adequate interpretation of the composition. He is therefore of necessity clothed with equally comprehensive authority. Soloists as well as chorus singers and orchestral players are properly under his direction. If a singer be incompetent, he will refuse to conduct for such. If a singer be competent and experienced, the conductor will not try to impose...

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