Mass Media And The Shaping Of American Feminism, 1963-1975

Mass Media And The Shaping Of American Feminism, 1963-1975

Mass Media and the Shaping of American Feminism, 1963-1975

Beginning in 1963 with the publication of Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique and reaching a high pitch ten years later with the televised mega-event of the "Battle of the Sexes"-the tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs-the mass media were intimately involved with both the distribution and the understanding of the feminist message.

This mass media promotion of the feminist profile, however, proved to be a double-edged sword, according to Patricia Bradley, author of Mass Media and the Shaping of American Feminism, 1963-1975. Although millions of women learned about feminism by way of the mass media, detrimental stereotypes emerged overnight. Often the events mounted by feminists to catch the media eye crystalized the negative image. All feminists soon came to be portrayed in the popular culture as "bra burners" and "strident women." Such depictions not only demeaned the achievements of their movement but also limited discussion of feminism to those subjects the media considered worthy, primarily equal pay for equal work.

Bradley's book examines the media traditions that served to curtail understandings of feminism. Journalists, following the craft formulas of their trade, equated feminism with the bizarre...

Related Books