Marcus Agrippa: Right-Hand Man Of Caesar Augustus

Marcus Agrippa: Right-Hand Man Of Caesar Augustus

Marcus Agrippa: Right-Hand Man of Caesar Augustus

Marcus Agrippa personified the term 'right-hand man'. As Emperor Augustus' deputy, he waged wars, pacified provinces, beautified Rome, and played a crucial role in laying the foundations of the Pax Romana for the next two hundred years - but he served always in the knowledge he would never rule in his own name. Why he did so, and never grasped power exclusively for himself, has perplexed historians for centuries. In his teens he formed a lifelong friendship with Julius Caesar's great nephew, Caius Octavius, which would change world history. Following Caesar’s assassination on the Ides of March 44 BC, Agrippa was instrumental in asserting his friend’s rights as the dictator's heir. He established a reputation as a bold admiral, defeating Sextus Pompeius at Mylae and Naulochus (36 BC), culminating in the epoch-making Battle of Actium (31 BC), which eliminated Marcus Antonius and Queen Cleopatra as rivals. He proved his genius for military command on land by ending bloody rebellions in the Cimmerian Bosporus, Gaul, Hispania and Illyricum. In Gaul Agrippa established the vital road network that helped turn Julius Caesar’s conquests into viable provinces. As a diplomat, he befriended Herod the Great of...

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